Adirondack Nature Trails:
Bloomingdale Bog Trail

Birds of the Adirondacks: Gray Jay on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (3 June 2017) Birds of the Adirondacks: Juvenile Gray Jay on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (3 June 2017) Adirondack Wetlands: Twobridge Brook on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (4 June 2011) Adirondack Shrubs: Leatherleaf on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (29 April 2017) Adirondack Mammals: Snowshoe Hare on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (3 June 2017) Adirondack Wetlands: Twobridge Brook on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (3 June 2017) Wetland Wildflowers of the Adirondacks: Cottongrass on Bloomingdale Bog (18 September 2015) Adirondack Butterflies: American Lady on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (3 June 2017) Adirondack Wetlands: Twobridge Brook on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (18 September 2015) Adirondack Wildflowers: Bunchberry in bloom on the Bloomingdale Bog  Trail (4 June 2011) Adirondack Wetlands: Boreal bog along the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (4 June 2011) Adirondack Wetlands: Swampland along the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (29 April 2017 Adirondack Wetlands: Marsh on the south end of the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (4 June 2017) Birds of the Adirondacks: Red-winged Blackbird on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (10 June 2017) Birds of the Adirondacks: Belted Kingfisher on the Bloomingdale Bog Trail (4 June 2017)
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The Bloomingdale Bog Trail follows an abandoned railroad right-of-way once used by the Chateaugay Division of the Delaware and Hudson Railroad that connected Plattsburgh to Saranac Lake. The trail is an elevated sandy, dirt, or gravel walkway with many open views of Bloomingdale Bog, one of the largest bogs in northern New York. The walking is easy along the level trail.

Bloomingdale Bog is one of the best places in the Adirondacks to find boreal birds. It also provides opportunities to search for wetland wildflowers. The area encompasses a bog and cedar woods with sedge marsh and coniferous woods.

Bloomingdale Bog may be accessed in two ways.

  • The south entrance is off Route 86, about a mile north of Saranac Lake. Here the trail first skirts a marsh. This is the best place to see marsh-dwelling birds like the Red-winged Blackbird, Belted Kingfisher, and Great Blue Heron. Ducks, such as the Hooded Merganser, can sometimes be seen in the open water of the marsh. A wide variety of warblers can be seen in the thickets along the elevated railroad bed.
  • The north entrance is about four miles to the northeast, off the Bloomingdale-Gabriels Road (County Route 55). This entrance provides immediate access to the boreal bog. The trail is bisected by the Bloomingdale-Gabriels Road. This is the best place to see Gray Jays, which can often be found by walking southwest about five or ten minutes. If you are looking for for Black-backed Woodpeckers, cross the Bloomingdale-Gabriels Road and walk northeast from this entrance; Black-backed Woodpeckers are most likely to be found around Bigelow Road (a dirt road, closed to traffic, that bisects the Bloomingdale Bog Trail.)

Birds heard and seen along the trail include:

Wildflowers and flowering shrubs commonly seen along this trail include:

Bog Laurel
Bunchberry
Canada Mayflower
Choke Cherry
Common Yarrow
Cottongrass
Cow-wheat
Dewdrop
Labrador Tea
Leatherleaf
Marsh Marigold
Northern Wild Raisin
Sheep Laurel
Shinleaf
Spotted Touch-Me-Not
Spreading Dogbane
Steeplebush
Swamp Candles
Tall Meadow Rue
White Meadowsweet
Whorled Wood Aster
Wild Columbine
Wild Sarsaparilla
Wintergreen
Yellow Pond Lily


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